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This Is Not A Love Song [Sound Archive] is an ongoing series of 15 minute audio recordings taken from major Art Institutions and Art Museums around the world, ambient sounds of the interior spaces, using a small handheld recorder.

The archive, representing approximately 200 locations on individual 12” 33rpm vinyl records, is to be presented as a large scale visual-audio touring exhibition. Throughout its development, a series of concise installations, each depicting a specific narrative significant to a single recording within the archive, will intermittently mark the 7 phases of the project corresponding to the 7 continents.

A central aim of the project is to collect ambient sounds belonging to specific locations remote from each other and to bring them into a singular local context. The project examines ideas of accessibility through permissions and labour by contrasting the scale of the viewing body and the institutional body.

The project was officially launched at COMA in Sydney, Australia in August 2019, with a solo exhibition. It has continued into Europe with a residency awarded by the Cite Internationale des Arts, Paris, completed August to November 2019; and will continue in the USA and Canada, mid 2020, through the support of two Vermont Studio Centre Fellowships.

The [Sound Archive] is being contributed to by a diverse and swiftly growing group of artists, writers, curators and academics across various fields and disciplines, including sound, architecture, film and dance, from 35 countries; to contribute recordings and research material to the archive remotely. The completed large scale visual-audio installation series will include a set of 200 one-off vinyl record pressings and documentation related to each cultural site examined. This Is Not A Love Song [Sound Archive] is Intended to culminate into a touring exhibition in 2022-23.

The project seeks to reach institutions by recording inside them. On occasion, conditional permission is granted, as with the Guggenheim Bilbao, Spain; the Tate Modern, London; and the Palais de la Porte Doree, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris.

 
Installation View: COMA gallery, opening night,  This Is Not A Love Song  Aug 2nd, 2019. Pictured, Invigilator Jack Prest (left);  This Is Not A Love Song Installation,  2019, 14:52mins, Vinyl, Record Player, Timber, Chroma-key Black Velvet, 60 x 120 x 360cm (Centre); Gallery visitor (Right).

Installation View: COMA gallery, opening night, This Is Not A Love Song Aug 2nd, 2019. Pictured, Invigilator Jack Prest (left); This Is Not A Love Song Installation, 2019, 14:52mins, Vinyl, Record Player, Timber, Chroma-key Black Velvet, 60 x 120 x 360cm (Centre); Gallery visitor (Right).

 
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THIS IS NOT A LOVE SONG: The first iteration of an ongoing project to gather and archive the sound of institutions around the world to find what might be universal to them through a study of ambience. The project collects the specificity of place and culture belonging to each recording in an ensemble to form a whole intercontinental big picture. In this first iteration, the place hasn’t been specified, removing the designation from a singular recording allows it to act as a proxy and precariously become a universal representation of institutional ambience.

Transposed audibly from one space to another, sound becomes a means of mixing signifiers relative to a given place and situation. If being somewhere has its own sound, then the ‘being there’ within a sound creates a means to transpose the listener from one place to another. The idea of transporting the listener in a conceptual manner is manifested through any kind of connection via an indexical link.

To view a catalogue of works for either show or to request further information please email info@comagallery.com

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SOLO EXHIBITION

Joe Wilson & Chanelle Collier

August 2nd - 29th. 2019

First Floor, 71 / 73 Stanley St, Darlinghurst NSW 2010

https://comagallery.com/

 
 
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The Very Best Of - Series.

2019. 32 x 32cm, Acrylic paint on vintage record covers.

CiTé Des Arts paris studio

The Very Best Of - paris sessions

2019. 32 x 32cm, Acrylic paint on vintage record covers.

The Very Best Of, painted vintage record covers are a kind of proxy or stand in for the recordings on vinyl that will be made. We are deep into the second phase of our project, This Is Not A Love Song [Sound Archive], making recordings of art institutions around the world. Through our residency in Europe we have developed 15+ peer partners to make recordings on our behalf, from many countries. While some institutions that we have contacted have ignored our requests, we have also begun relationships with others, gaining permission and unique access. For our project we envisage 7 audio installations for 7 continents plus the sound archive itself of 100 – 200 recordings on vinyl. Our ambition is that this content will tour through regional spaces. The project investigates the relationship between the viewing body and the institutional body. It is about access, permission, and labour.  For audiences we see this archive as a means of brings remote locations into a single local context.

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Below are images of studio workshops with Swiss performing artist, Jasminka Stenz, dancer and choreographer. This also included fellow Australian audio and conceptual artist Jack Prest. Incorporating the Paris studio and its adjacent courtyard as a performing ground. Live microphones were used to make a reactive audio feedback to actions and moving objects in various compositional episodes. Investigating the boundaries between performance and performative actions, Jasminka intuited movement and bodily composition while Chanelle and Joe exercised their own natural studio movements by organising objects. Jack manipulated live sounds into reactive ambient soundscapes.

collab duo

Joe Wilson and Chanelle Collier are a collaborative artist duo. They use painting and substitutes for painting to explore the position of the image in relation to the viewing body. By incorporating unconventional materials and modes of display, they stimulate a semi-performative engagement with their exhibitions as a medium in itself. Expressing humour and absurd configurations within a diverse practice they frequently address the exchange value of labour by disrupting the vectors of artist, viewer, and gallery.